Meet Peter Slack

Peter N. Slack is President and CEO of The Wyanoke Group. Peter is past-Chairman and a current member of the Board of Trustees for the Center for Family Services, a nonprofit human services agency. Other professional titles and memberships have included Board of Directors of the International Association of Association Management Companies and Board of Directors of the American Medical Publishers Association. In addition, Peter is President of the Broadway Theatre of Pitman.

HISTORY OF OUR NAME

By Peter Slack, President & CEO, the Wyanoke Group

With roots reaching back to 1923, the Wyanoke Group has been committed to providing the clinical information and education health care professionals need to stay informed and improve patient health.

The origin of our name stems from the summer camp, Camp Wyanoke, on the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. Its emblem includes just two words: Courage. Loyalty. Camp Wyanoke was attended and enjoyed by our founder Charles B. Slack (my father) and his brother Neal Slack in the 1940s and later by my brother Sam and I in the 1960s.

Many think the name stems from Native American heritage, but it is a specific spot in New Hampshire where an old oak tree stood near a Y in the road — that is Y and Oak or Wyanoke.

The camp holds many memories for the Slack family and for every camper still alive. Camp Wyanoke started in 1909 and operated until it was sold for residential housing in 1975. There is an abundance of nostalgia personally for what it meant and continues to mean in the lessons taught and morals established day in and day out. The “Wyanoke Standards” and this quote from the camp’s founder Walter Bentley still resonates with me today: “Give these boys the best that you have, and ‘the harvest will be a hundred-fold.’”

We at the Wyanoke Group are proud to carry on the values and traditions instilled by the leaders of the Camp, along with the philosophies that underpin the Camp Wyanoke Standards.

Camp Wyanoke Standards

To provide a camp where a boy is safe, morally and physically.

To fill every day brimful of fun and happiness and the keen zest of healthy living.

To stimulate the boy’s growth and development.

To afford the companionship of manly boys.

To provide the careful supervision of men who, by instinct and training, are gentlemen.

To furnish ample opportunity for happy and profitable activities.

To give each boy personal attention that he may receive a full measure of pleasure and profit from these activities.

To inspire boys with the ideals of right living and clear thinking; to impress on them the value of friendship and of making a worthy contribution to their home life.